Cleveland-Marshall

Third Semester of Legal Writing – Each student is required to take at least one legal writing course in addition to the core Legal Research, Writing and Advocacy Course in the first year. Students may choose from a group of courses to be designated by the faculty. These courses have included Scholarly Writing, General Legal Drafting, Subject Matter Specified Legal Drafting, Legal Writing and Litigation, and Appellate Advocacy. Normally, the third semester course in Legal Writing will be taken during the Fall or Spring of the second year for full-time students or the Spring of the second year or the Fall or Spring of the third year for part-time students.

Upper Level Paper

The Upper Level Required Paper may be met by satisfactory completion of a seminar or specified upper level course for which a substantial paper is required or satisfactory completion of an appropriate two or three semester-hour Independent Legal Research project. A full-time faculty member must supervise every Independent Legal Research project. An Associate Dean must approve any project to be supervised by an adjunct faculty member.

Students who are invited, either on the basis of grades or on the basis of the Summer Writing Competition, to join the staff of the Cleveland State Law Review, the Journal of Law and Health, or the Global Business Law Review are required to complete a student note as staff members. This is often done in conjunction with an Independent Legal Research project – the paper is ultimately turned in to both the law review (or journal) editors and to the faculty member supervising the project. Students may sign up for this credit during the Fall or Spring semester that they are serving on the review or journal staff.

Normally, students produce a paper of a minimum of 24 pages, excluding footnotes, for two hours and a minimum of 36 pages, excluding footnotes, for three hours for Independent Legal Research credit. Supervising faculty may exercise the discretion to award credit but withhold upper level writing certification for a project whether completed for Independent Legal Research or in a course or seminar in which a paper is required or is an option.